Monthly archives: July, 2013

More Festival Footage!!

Hair braider and Loctician Fana Chisolm speaking on her experiences with Black hair


AACC current exhibit!

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The African-American Cultural Center invites to come and visit our current exhibit, The Reason Why the Colored American is Not in the World’s Columbian Exposition.  Come and explore how the Center utilizes the occasion of the 120th anniversary of Chicago’s World’s Fair to focus on the diverse perspectives, desires and experiences of a number of African-American stakeholders who recognized the potential of the Fair as an opportunity to present “Colored Americans” to the world. This project identifies the particular frustrations of a number of outspoken authors and activists who felt that they should have been included in the Fair’s planning process; it also calls attention to a variety of Fair events and activities that did include “Colored Americans.”

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Gallery hrs of operation: Monday- Friday 9am to 4pm

FREE admission and open to the general public


It Happened On This Date In History!

Today, July 2nd, we celebrate the life and times of Medgar Wiley Evers (July 2, 1925 – June 12, 1963); an African American civil rights activist from Mississippi involved in efforts to overturn segregation at the University of Mississippi. After returning from overseas military service in World War II and completing his secondary education, he became active in the civil rights movement. He became a field secretary for the NAACP.

Evers was assassinated by Byron De La Beckwith, a member of the White Citizens’ Council. As a veteran, Evers was buried with full military honors at Arlington National Cemetery. His murder and the resulting trials inspired civil rights protests, as well as numerous works of art, music, and film.

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Posted by Kay James McCrimon

 

Posted by Kay James McCrimon


It Happened On This Date In History!

On July 2, 1943, Lieutenant Charles Hall (99th Pursuit Squadron) became the first African American pilot to shoot down a Nazi plane.

Charles “Buster” Hall was born on Aug. 25, 1920 in Brazil, Indiana.  

He made history as being one of the first 43 African-American pilots trained for combat as part of the 99th Pursuit Squadron during World War II. During combat, Hall shot down three enemy planes and was the first African-American to shoot down an enemy plane, when he shot down a German Focke-Wulf 190 on July 2, 1943.

This marked the first air victory for the United States by black airmen in the European Theater.

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Posted by Kay James McCrimon


It Happened On This Date In History!

On July 1, 1898, four African American regiments fought diligently near Santiago in the Spanish American War.  The Tenth Calvary made a charge at El Caney, Cuba, in relief of Teddy Roosevelt’s “Rough Riders.”  

The 10th Cavalry Regiment is a unit of the United States Army. Formed as a segregated African-American unit, the 10th Cavalry was one of the original “Buffalo Soldier” regiments. It served in combat during the Indian Wars in the western United States, the Spanish-American War in Cuba and in the Philippine-American War. The regiment was trained as a combat unit but later relegated to non-combat duty and served in that capacity in World War II until its deactivation in 1944.

The 10th Cavalry was reactivated as an integrated combat unit in 1958. Portions of the regiment have served in conflicts ranging from the Vietnam War to Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom. The current structure is by squadron, with the 1st, 4th, and 7th Squadrons assigned to three brigades of the U.S. 4th Infantry Division at Ft Carson, Colorado.

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Posted by Kay McCrimon

 


It Happened On This Date in History!

On July 1st, the African nations of Somalia (1960) and Rwanda (1962), and Burundi (1962) gained independence.

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Posted by Kay McCrimon


It Happened On This Date in History!

On this day, July 1, 1889, American abolitionist, author, and orator, Frederick Douglass was named Minister to Haiti.  Douglass was appointed by President William Henry Harrison.  The appointment lasted for 2 years until 1891. Frederick died four years later at his home – Cedar Hill – in Washington, D.C. in 1895.

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Posted by Kay McCrimon


It Happened On This Date In History

On this date, July 1, 1839, in one of the most famous slave revolts ever, Joseph Cinque and over 50 slaves seized the slave ship Amistad and killed its captain and most of its crew.

Sengbe Pieh (c. 1814 – c. 1879), later known as Joseph Cinqué, was a West African man of the Mende people and was the most prominent defendant in the case United States v. The Amistad, in which it was found that he and 51 others had been victims of the illegal Atlantic slave trade.

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Posted by Kay McCrimon


Brittney’s skepticism on chicken and waffles part 2

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Dr. Baptista decided to order the chicken and waffles…smh!


Offerings

Offerings

Offerings from nature, when burned the purpose was to return them into the earth with hopes of peace and harmony


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